​Albany, NY – Being a sex offender carries with it the often well-earned reputation of being unable to mix with society. Even hardened criminals have expressed their disgust with the lewd and deviant acts perpetrated by sex offenders. A recent study has found dozens of sex offenders in New York State living in group homes for people with developmental disabilities. Their crimes can run the gamut from watching child pornography to public exposure to sexual assault.

In his capacity as Chairman of the New York State Senate Investigations and Government Operations Committee, Senator Terrence Murphy has received numerous inquiries from concerned citizens regarding the housing of violent convicted felons and sex offenders in group homes for the mentally disabled.

In response, Senator Murphy wrote a letter to Anthony J. Annucci, Commissioner of the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, and Kerry A. Delany, Commissioner of the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities on October 3rd, requesting clarification of their policies. His concerns include the standards for placing violent felons and sexual predators in residential facilities; how to keep residents, staff and the surrounding community safe; notifying residents, their families and the community before dangerous sex offenders are placed; and training and educating the staff of residential facilities.

“The idea of putting a registered sex offender under the same roof as someone who is developmentally disabled and unable to care for themselves defies logic,” said Senator Murphy.  “Nothing good can come from this policy. You’re dealing with a very vulnerable population. While the sex offenders are themselves developmentally disabled, that doesn’t mean they’re any less dangerous. Families put their loved ones in these homes so they can get specialized care, not so they end up living in constant fear of being sexually assaulted.”

The issue came to light through the efforts of Jonathan Carey Foundation, which identified at least 25 sex offenders living in group homes for the developmentally disabled in parts around the state. The organization maintains that placing sex offenders with disabled individuals violates a state law that prohibits endangering the welfare of an incompetent and physically disabled person.

Legislation was proposed last year to make it illegal for sex offenders with developmental disabilities to be in community residences. The bill was passed by the State Senate, but stalled in the Assembly.

Carmel, NY – Everyone knows someone whose life has been devastated by drug addiction. In 2016, more than 42,249 people in the United States died of opioid overdoses, an average of more than 115 deaths per day. People between the ages of 25 to 34 have accounted for the most opioid deaths – 10,732 – an increase of 774% since 1999.

To help slow the escalation of fatalities due to overdoses, Senator Terrence Murphy recently partnered with Assemblyman Kevin Byrne, Arms Acres and Drug Crisis in Our Backyard to sponsor a free Narcan Event. The event led by Tammy Bender, Regional Assistant and Certified Addiction Coach for Arms Acres & Conifer Park, and Marie O’Connor, Project Coordinator Partnership for Success for the Putnam Coalition was held at Arms Acres.

“As a member of the Senate’s Heroin and Opioid Task Force, I’ve traveled throughout the state and seen the many challenges addiction poses to both the user and their families,” said Senator Murphy. “I sponsored legislation to keep doctors from writing thirty days’ worth of prescriptions; now it’s seven days. I implemented a ‘Shed the Meds’ program that in the past four years has taken thousands of expired and unwanted prescription drugs out of people’s medicine cabinets, keeping them out of the wrong hands. I’ve also been a strong advocate for the use of Narcan. It’s pulled many people from the brink of death. This training will put more people on the street who will know how to deal with an overdose, and I’m in favor of that.”

A former volunteer firefighter and EMT for the Kent Volunteer Fire Department, Assemblyman Kevin Byrne has also become a proponent for Narcan training. “Everyone has to be a first responder when it comes to the opioid epidemic,” he said. “This training can really help save the life of someone you care about or give a total stranger a second chance.”

During the training, Ms. Bender noted, “Nearly everyone reacts differently when they are administered Naloxone. Some people may need to have Narcan administered more than once. The key to saving a life is to call 911 as quickly as possible.”

“It takes all sectors of the community and strong partnerships to continue the goal of raising awareness about the heroin and opioid epidemic,” stated Ms. O’Connor. “Prevention, treatment, and recovery are valuable components but we must keep expanding our ability to manage the ever-increasing number of overdoses in the community. In Putnam County, all first responders are trained in the use of Naloxzone, and all Putnam School Districts have at least one Naloxzone trained registered nurse.”

Money Goes Towards Refurbishing Carmel Headquarters

Carmel, NY – There are more than 128,000 New Yorkers with developmental disabilities, including intellectual disabilities, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, autism, and other neurological impairments. The Arc of Putnam County, one of 46 chapters of The Arc of New York, is at the forefront in providing advocacy and programming for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. To help ARC continue its mission to empower individuals to achieve their highest quality of life, Senator Terrence Murphy recently secured a grant of $50,000 to ARC’s Carmel facility.

“We want to make sure this facility will stay here for as long as possible. The State was able to secure $50,000 in funds to ensure that ARC stays put,” said Senator Murphy. “You’re helping people with developmental disabilities get the assistance they need, while providing them with the hope of a brighter future. What you do is commendable, and makes a difference in families’ lives.”

Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell said, “On behalf of the people of Putnam County, who recognized how important ARC is to our community, I want to thank Senator Murphy for the grant he was instrumental in securing. It’s money well spent. When you put money in good hands, you know it’s going directly to the programs that will help people. We have to make sure these programs are available so we can have a healthy and thriving community for everyone. Arc provides excellent services for families, and adds to the quality of life for people in Putnam County.”

“Thank you, Senator Murphy, for allocating the funding for ARC’s future,” Carmel Town Supervisor Kenneth Schmitt added. “We have a great team on the State, County and Town levels and we’ll continue to support ARC and all that you do for the community. It is important that ARC is able to continue to help people with developmental disabilities integrate more fully and effectively into the mainstream of community life.”

ARC’s Executive Director John McHugh stated, “They say it takes a village to make a community. In this case, it takes a town, a county, and a state. We’re very appreciative of the help we have received from Senator Murphy, County Executive Odell and Supervisor Schmitt. We’re looking forward to what lies ahead. The money allows us to set the stage to help people in a very dynamic way. Without this assistance, the work we do wouldn’t be possible.”

Spencer Terwilliger, Director of Capital Projects and Jami Anson, Director of Development & Outreach were on hand to celebrate presentation of the grant with Executive Director McHugh In turn, Senator Murphy, County Executive Dell and Supervisor Schmitt congratulated McHugh for his recent appointment as Executive Director.

McHugh was formerly Executive Director of The Arc of Ulster-Greene. He replace long-term executive, Susan Limongello, who recently retired after serving the agency for almost 18 years. McHugh joined The Arc of Ulster-Greene in early 2008 as Chief Financial Officer and became Executive Director in 2013. He has over 18 years of financial experience in the disability services field and hospital administration.

The Arc of Putnam County was founded in 1974 by a group of parents seeking better lives and more opportunities for their children with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Programs and services currently offered by The Arc of Putnam include: Residential services, Preschool services, Day Habilitation, Vocational services, Work Readiness training, Community Employment, Clinic Services, Educational Advocacy, Service Coordination, Traumatic Brain Injury networking, Guardianship, Community Habilitation, Recreation, Respite, and Self-Advocacy.

Montrose, NY – Just this week, as tornados whipped through the Hudson Valley, we were reminded that humanity is hardly a match for Mother Nature. Battling the elements is a significant part of a firefighter’s trade but they also must have the right equipment to be successful. To enhance the Montrose Fire Department’s ability to respond to rescue and emergency situations, Senator Terrence Murphy recently provided the department with a $10,000 grant to purchase a specialized all-terrain vehicle (ATV).

“This new ATV will give firefighters and emergency medical personnel easy access to wooded areas, bike paths, and other off road places wherever there’s a need to transport someone who is sick or injured,” said Senator Murphy. “We’ve had frequent and intense storms this past year, resulting in many downed live wires and fallen trees. Sometimes fire engines and ambulances can’t get through the debris to provide aid. This ATV is quick, agile, and will help firefighters cope with adverse weather conditions.”

Murphys 10000 grant provides Montrose FD with new ATV2

“We deeply appreciate Senator Murphy’s commitment to help first responders,” said Montrose Fire District Commissioner Robert Lockwood. “The vehicle can be used for a wide range of duties, including helping us put out the brush fires that crop up in Blue Mountain Reservation. That area is also popular for its bike trails, and the ATV will be useful in getting injured riders out. Many people use ATVs as toys. This one may help save a life.”

Carmel, NY – Everyone who deserves a second chance gets one in Judge James Reitz’s Putnam County Drug Court.

Founded in 2007 by Judge Reitz, the Putnam County Drug Court has an 87% success rate. The program is a coordinated team effort between Judge Reitz, the prosecution, defense counsel, probation department, sheriff’s department, social service, and treatment professionals to break the cycle of substance abuse. It takes about two years for participants to complete the program.

Senator Terrence Murphy recently secured a $5,000 grant to continue funding for this vitally needed program. Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell and Carmel Town Supervisor Kenneth Schmitt, advocates who have also supported the Drug Court, were on hand to celebrate the news with Judge Reitz.

“I’ve sat on the Senate’s Heroin and Opioid Task Force for the past three years, and I’ve traveled throughout the state seeing the effects of the drug crisis firsthand,” said Senator Murphy. “This program should be implemented throughout New York State. You’re literally giving people a second chance. What you and your staff do to put people back on track not only changes their lives, it also helps the community as well. I’m pleased we were able to get $5,000 to help the program continue.”

Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell said, “This program Judge Reitz’s Drug Court represents a road back to society for people whose lives have been derailed by drug abuse. If not for this court, recidivism would soar. Thank you, Judge Reitz, Senator Murphy and Supervisor (Kenneth) Schmitt for being part of our army against heroin and drug addiction.”

Judge Reitz stated, “I want to thank Senator Murphy, County Executive Odell, and Supervisor Schmitt for their support. This money will help save lives. It will help people get their lives together so they can take care of themselves and their families. This money will go a long way in providing training and education.”

Senator Murphy recalled sitting in Drug Court and being moved by the story of a U.S Marine Corps veteran who has been wounded by an explosive device. He spent time in a veteran’s home recovering, became hooked on oxycodone, wound up homeless, and was sentenced to eight years in the state penitentiary. “He went through Judge Reitz’s two-year program, and now he’s clean,” Senator Murphy noted.

Judge Reitz added, “He was actually lucky he was arrested because he was at death’s door. We got him turned around, and now he’s helping people in similar situations. He’s a great advocate for the program. He’s exactly what we need in the field to help others because he knows what it’s like to hit bottom.”

Judge Reitz began his career in 1991 as a private general practice lawyer. He then worked as an attorney for a major law firm from 2002 to 2006. He also served as a Carmel Town Court Justice from 1996 to 2006. In 2007, he became a multi-bench judge of the Putnam County Court and an Acting Supreme Court Justice.

PEEKSKILL, NY – In front of a small crowd at a last minute thrown together event at the Kiley Center in Peekskill, Governor Andrew Cuomo today faced serious questions over the nature of his past employment of Democratic Senate candidate Peter Harckham, whom he endorsed at the event. Pay-stubs from the last two years indicate Harckham had “double-dipped” from two state positions simultaneously, earning over $311,000.

“Career politician Peter Harckham used his connections with a top state official and fellow South Salem resident recently convicted of bribery, who was also the Governor’s campaign manager, to get two full time political patronage jobs at the same time,” Martha Ruiz Jiménez, the spokesperson for the Committee to Elect Terrence Murphy said. “Harckham collected more than $311,000 through these two low-show political jobs, an outrageous abuse of taxpayer money. Now, he wants to be our State Senator so he can further exploit the system and collect another taxpayer-funded salary at our expense.”

Freedom of Information Law requests, the Governor’s own Project Sunlight website, the Empire Center for Public Policy’s SeeThruNY and the Authorities Budget Office’s Public Authorities Reporting Information system confirm that in both 2016 and 2017, Harckham was employed as working as BOTH the “Assistant Director OCR” and “Director of Intergovernmental Affairs/New NY Bridge” simultaneously.[1][2][3][4][5]

Harckham was recently in the news for his work as Director of Intergovernmental Affairs for the “New NY Bridge” project, where, according to the Journal News, he was not important enough to be privy to the opening date of the bridge, just two weeks before it opened.[6] Some residents questioned how that could be the case, which led to further inquiries about how and when Harckham had assumed this position, as  there was no announcement of it from the Governor’s office, even though full-court press had been done for his initial hiring with the Cuomo administration as “Assistant Director of the Office of Community Renewal.”[7]

The Office of Community Renewal is located in Albany, while the New NY Bridge is located in Tarrytown, raising questions as to how Harckham could be in two places at once. Although Harckham’s title was in the Office of Community Renewal, his paycheck was paid by the Housing Finance Trust Corporation, which appears to be a subsidiary public benefit corporation of the New York State Housing Finance Agency.

“The Housing Finance Trust Corporation is supposed to build affordable housing – not pay political employees,” Ruiz Jiminez said. “The Governor’s actions violate decent morality, and decent values. He is legendary for hiding political staff on different agency payrolls than those which actually employ them.”

Additionally, although Harckham served as Director of Intergovernmental Affairs for the Thruway Authority, there is but one mention of him on the Thruway Authority’s website.[8] It was further unclear what, if anything Mr. Harckham did at the Office of Community Renewal, but in his time there, it would appear as though he attended one meeting and was cited in a slide presentation on fair housing.[9]


[1] Harckam, Peter. Payrolls. SeeThroughNY. Retrieved 10/5/18 from https://www.seethroughny.net/payrolls/84646514
[2] Annual Report for Housing Trust Fund Corporation. Fiscal Year Ending:03/31/2017. PARIS Public Authorities Reporting Information System: New York State Authorities Budget Office. Retrieved from https://www.abo.ny.gov/annualreports/PARISAnnualReports/FYE2017/State/ARHousingTrustFundCorporation2017.pdf
[3] Annual Report for New York State Thruway Authority. Fiscal Year Ending:03/31/2017. PARIS Public Authorities Reporting Information System: New York State Authorities Budget Office. Retrieved from  https://www.abo.ny.gov/annualreports/PARISAnnualReports/FYE2017/State/ARNewYorkStateThruwayAuthority2017.pdf
[4] Annual Report for Housing Trust Fund Corporation. Fiscal Year Ending:03/31/2016. PARIS Public Authorities Reporting Information System: New York State Authorities Budget Office. Retrieved from https://www.abo.ny.gov/annualreports/PARISAnnualReports/FYE2016/State/ARHousingTrustFundCorp2016.pdf
[5] Annual Report for New York State Thruway Authority. Fiscal Year Ending:03/31/2016. PARIS Public Authorities Reporting Information System: New York State Authorities Budget Office. Retrieved from https://www.abo.ny.gov/annualreports/PARISAnnualReports/FYE2016/State/ARNYSThruwayAuthority2016.pdf
[6] Matt Coyne. “Tappan Zee Bridge document requests show staff in the dark about opening.” Journal News, July 9, 2018. Retrieved from https://www.lohud.com/story/news/local/tappan-zee-bridge/2018/07/09/tappan-zee-bridge-cuomo/768998002/
[7] Governor Cuomo Announces Administration Appointments. Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. May 20, 2015. Retrieved from https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/governor-cuomo-announces-administration-appointments-19
[8] site:thruway.ny.gov Harckham. (Search Query). Google.com. Retrieved 10/5/2018 from https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Athruway.ny.gov+harckham
[9] site:nyschr.org.ny.gov Peter Harckham. (Search Query). Google.com. Retrieved 10/5/2018 from https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Anyshcr.org+”peter+harckham
ALBANY, NY – The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) has endorsed Senator Terrence Murphy for re-election in the 40th Senate District amid news that U.S. weekly job claims have dropped to a 49-year low since Murphy took office. NFIB is the leading small-business association with ten thousand members in New York representing nearly every conceivable type of employer or industry in the state’s economy.
“Businesses are not built by passing laws and overregulation, they have to stand on their own merit,” Senator Murphy said. “As a lifelong small business owner, I know that better than most. I’m proud to carry the NFIB banner and work for a New York first policy that helps ordinary New Yorkers.”
“New York’s small and independent businesses employ half of our state’s workforce,” Greg Biryla, NFIB’s NY State Director said. “The best way to grow the small business economy, is to send small business supporters to Albany.” Senator Murphy has “demonstrated through words and action that [he] will be the champion that small businesses need on the issues that matter most.”
From the time Senator Murphy took office in 2015 up til now, unemployment in Westchester and the Hudson Valley has fallen to their lowest levels since 2007. As of September, it is down to just 3.6% in Dutchess County from 5.4% in January 2015, 3.8% in Putnam County, down from 5%, and 4.1% in Westchester County (down from 5.3%). “Albany shouldn’t be picking winners and losers when we need to be able to compete in the global economy, so my mission has been to promote economic growth and freedom, and the results show,” Senator Murphy added.
The NFIB adds its name to a growing list of endorsements, which include:
  • Affiliated Police Associations of Westchester-Putnam AFL-CIO
    • Ardsley Police PBA
    • Beacon Police PBA
    • Bedford Police PBA
    • Briarcliff Manor Police PBA
    • Bronxville Police PBA
    • Croton-On-Hudson Police PBA
    • Dobbs Ferry Police PBA
    • Eastchester Police PBA
    • Eastchester Police SOA
    • Elmsford Police PBA
    • Greenburgh Police PBA
    • Harrison Police PBA
    • Hastings-On-Hudson Police PBA
    • Irvington Police PBA
    • Larchmont Police PBA
    • Lewisboro Town Police PBA
    • Mamaroneck Town Police PBA
    • Mamaroneck Village Police PBA
    • Mount Kisco Police PBA
    • Mount Pleasant Police PBA
    • Mount Vernon Police PBA
    • MTA Police PBA
    • New Castle Police PBA
    • New Rochelle Police PBA
    • New Rochelle Police SOA
    • New York State Troopers PBA
    • New York State Park Police
    • New York State University Police
    • North Castle Police PBA
    • Ossining Village Police PBA
    • Peekskill Police PBA
    • Pelham Manor Police PBA
    • Pelham Police PBA
    • Pleasantville Police PBA
    • Port Chester Police PBA
    • Poughkeepsie Police PBA
    • Rye Brook Police PBA
    • Rye City Police PBA
    • Scarsdale Police PBA
    • Sleepy Hollow Police PBA
    • Tarrytown Police PBA
    • Tuckahoe Police PBA
    • Warwick Police PBA
  • American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees
    • AFSCME District Council 35
    • New York City District Council of Municipal Local Unions, District Council 37
    • New York County and Municipal Employees, District Council 66
    • New York State Law Enforcement Officers Union, District Council 82
    • Community and Social Agency Employees, District Council 1707
  • Asbestos Workers Local 91
  • Boilermakers Local 5
  • Bricklayers & Allied Crafts Local 5
  • Bridge & Structural Steel Painters Local 806
  • Building and Construction Trades Council of New York State AFL-CIO
  • Building and Construction Trades Council of Westchester-Putnam AFL-CIO
  • Civil Service Employees Association of New York State Local 1000
  • Civil Service Employees Association of Westchester County Local 9200
  • Council of Administrators & Supervisors
  • Detectives Endowment Association
  • Elevator Constructors Local 1
  • Empire State Supervisors & Administrators Association
  • Fire Marshal Benevolent Association of Nassau County
  • Hudson Valley Area Labor Federation AFL-CIO
  • Hudson Valley Building & Construction Trades Council AFL-CIO
    • LiUNA Laborers’ Local 17
    • IEUC Elevator Constructors Local 138
    • IUOE Upstate New York Operating Engineers Local 158
    • LiUNA Cement Masons Local 262
    • Carpenters Local 279
    • Plumbers & Steamfitters Local 373
    • Teamsters Local 445
    • Millwrights Local 1163
  • IAFF Local 2956 Lake Mohegan Professional Firefighters
  • IAFF Local 628 Yonkers Fire
  • IBEW Electrical Workers Local 3
  • IBEW Electrical Workers Local 363
  • Iron Workers Local 40
  • Iron Workers Local 417
  • Ironworkers Local 197 Derrickmen and Riggers
  • IUOE Operating Engineers Local 137
  • IUOE Operating Engineers Local 15
  • IUOE Operating Engineers Local 30
  • IUPAT Local 262 Operative Plaster
  • IUPAT Local 7 Title, Marble & Terrazzo
  • IUPAT Local 8A-28A Metal Polishers
  • IUPAT Local Union 1087 Glaziers
  • IUPAT Painters District Council 9
  • LiUNA Local 235 Building Laborers’
  • LiUNA Local 60 Road Laborers’
  • LiUNA Local 669 Road Sprinkler Fitters
  • Mason Tenders District Council Of Greater New York & Long Island
  • Medical Society of the State of New York
  • Metallic Lathers and Reinforcing Ironworkers Local 46
  • MTA Police Benevolent Association
  • Nassau County Deputy Sheriff’s Benevolent Association Inc.
  • Nassau County Police Medic Association Inc.
  • Nassau County Sheriff’s Correction Officers Benevolent Association
  • New England Regional Council of Carpenters
  • New York City Uniformed Fire Officers Local 854 AFL-CIO
  • New York State AFL-CIO
  • New York State Building and Construction Trades Council
  • New York State Conference of the International Union of Operating Engineers
  • New York State Laborers’ Union
    • Blasters, Drill Runners and Miners Local Union 29
    • Concrete Workers District Council 16
      • Cement and Concrete Workers Local Union 6-A
      • Cement and Concrete Workers Local Union 18-A
      • Cement and Concrete Workers Local Union 20
    • Mason Tenders District Council Of Greater New York & Long Island
      • LiUNA General Building Laborers’ Local 66
      • LiUNA Construction & General Building Laborers’ Local 79
      • LiUNA Asbestos Lead and Hazardous Waste Laborers’ Local 78
      • LiUNA Waste Material, Recycling & General Industrial Laborers’ Local 108
      • Lay Faculty Association Local 1261
    • LiUNA Building Concrete, Excavation and Common Laborers’ Local Union 731
    • LiUNA Pavers & Roadbuilders District Council Laborers’ Local Union 101
  • New York State Nurses Association
  • New York State Pipe Trades Association
  • New York State Public Employees Federation
  • New York State Troopers PBA
  • Painters District Council 9
  • Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association
  • PBA of NYS
    • New York State Environmental Conservation Police Officers PBA
    • New York State Environmental Conservation Police Lieutenants Benevolent Association
    • New York State Environmental Conservation Police Superior Officers Association
    • New York State Forest Rangers PBA
    • New York State Forest Rangers Lieutenants Benevolent Association
    • New York State Forest Rangers Superior Officers Association
    • New York State Park Police Officers PBA
    • New York State Park Police Sergeants Benevolent Association
    • New York State Park Police Superior Officers Association
    • New York State University Police Lieutenants Benevolent Association
    • New York State University Police Officers PBA
  • Police Association of NYS (NYSAPBA)
    • Amityville PBA
    • East Hampton Town PBA
    • East Hampton Village PBA
    • Floral Park PBA
    • Freeport PBA
    • Glen Cove PBA
    • Great Neck Estates PBA
    • Hempstead PBA
    • Kings Point PBA
    • Lake Success PBA
    • Long Beach PBA
    • Lynbrook PBA
    • Malverne PBA
    • MTA PBA
    • Nassau County Detectives’ Association
    • Nassau County PBA
    • Nassau County Superior Officers’ Association
    • NYC Captains’ Endowment Association
    • NYC District Attorneys Detective Investigators’ Association
    • NYC Detectives’ Endowment Association
    • NYC Lieutenants’ Benevolent Association
    • NYC Retired Transit Police Association
    • NYC Sergeants’ Benevolent Association
    • NYS Park Police PBA
    • Old Brookville PBA
    • Old Westbury PBA
    • PBA of NYS – Environmental Conservation Police
    • PBA of NYS – Forest Rangers
    • PBA of NYS – Park Police
    • PBA of NYS – University (SUNY) Police
    • Port Authority PBA
    • Port Authority Police Detectives’ Endowment Association
    • Port Authority Police Lieutenants’ Benevolent Association
    • Port Authority Police Sergeants’ Benevolent Association
    • Port Washington PBA
    • Quogue Village
    • Retired Police Association of New York State
    • Riverhead PBA
    • Rockville Centre PBA
    • Sands Point PBA
    • Southampton Town PBA
    • Southampton Village PBA
    • Suffolk County Detectives’ Association
    • Suffolk County Detective Investigators’ PBA
    • Suffolk County Police Conference
    • Suffolk County Superior Officers’ Association
    • Waterfront Commission PBA
  • Police Conference of New York
  • Sheet Metal Workers Local 137
  • Sheet Metal Workers Local 38 JATC
  • Suffolk County Correction Officers Association
  • Supreme Court Officers Association
  • Teamsters Joint Council 16
  • Teamsters Local 456
  • Teamsters Local 813
  • Teamsters Local 81
  • UA Plumbers & Steamfitters Local 21
  • UBCJA Millwright & Machinery Erectors Local Union 740
  • UBCJA Local 1456 Dockbuilders
  • UBCJA Local 2287 Resilient Floor Coverers
  • UFA of Greater New York (FDNY) Local 94 IAFF
  • Uniformed EMS Officers Union, Local 3621 – FDNY
  • Uniformed EMT’s, Paramedics and Inspectors Local 2507 FDNY
  • Uniformed Fire Alarm Dispatchers Benevolent Association FDNY
  • United Cement Union Local 780
  • United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers Local 8
  • Utility Workers of America Local 1-2
  • Westchester County Correction Officers Benevolent Association
  • Westchester County Correction Superior Officers Benevolent Association
  • Westchester County PBA
  • Westchester Putnam Central Labor Body AFL-CIO
  • Yonkers PBA

New York City Council Of Carpenters & New England Regional Council Of Carpenters Back State Senator Terrence Murphy

​BALDWIN PLACE, NY –  Few organizations have advocated for the safety and advancement for workers’ rights than the New York City Council of Carpenters and the New England Regional Council of Carpenters.  Both organizations have stood on the front line fighting for fair wages for their workers, safe workplaces and accountability of employers.  At a rally yesterday, both unions emphatically endorsed State Senator Terrence Murphy for re-election.

Senator Murphy said, “I was raised in a union home and learned early about the values of hard work, dedication and sacrifice.  The members of the New York City Council of Carpenters and the New England Regional Council of Carpenters work everyday to earn a fair wage so they can deliver for their families.  It is our obligation to make sure their workplace is safe, their wages are fair and they have a jobs right here in New York.  I’m proud to stand with them and thank them for their support.”

Grahm McHugh, President of the New York City District Council of Carpenters said, “We are proud to endorse New York State Senator Terrence Murphy.  Senator Murphy has always understood the issues facing working people across New York State.  He has been a consistent advocate fighting for quality jobs and fair standards.”

Bill Banfield, Eastern New York Regional Manager of the New England Regional Council of Carpenters added, “Through this campaign and throughout his career, Senator Murphy has been a strong advocate for members of the NERCC and their families, specifically through his work and sponsorship of legislation that would finally define public works.  We believe he will continue to be a tireless partner on the issues that face a 21st century workforce.”

Both organizations add their names to an unprecedented list of endorsements for the two term State Senator which includes:

  • Affiliated Police Associations of Westchester-Putnam AFL-CIO
    • Ardsley Police PBA
    • Beacon Police PBA
    • Bedford Police PBA
    • Briarcliff Manor Police PBA
    • Bronxville Police PBA
    • Croton-On-Hudson Police PBA
    • Dobbs Ferry Police PBA
    • Eastchester Police PBA
    • Eastchester Police SOA
    • Elmsford Police PBA
    • Greenburgh Police PBA
    • Harrison Police PBA
    • Hastings-On-Hudson Police PBA
    • Irvington Police PBA
    • Larchmont Police PBA
    • Lewisboro Town Police PBA
    • Mamaroneck Town Police PBA
    • Mamaroneck Village Police PBA
    • Mount Kisco Police PBA
    • Mount Pleasant Police PBA
    • Mount Vernon Police PBA
    • MTA Police PBA
    • New Castle Police PBA
    • New Rochelle Police PBA
    • New Rochelle Police SOA
    • New York State Troopers PBA
    • New York State Park Police
    • New York State University Police
    • North Castle Police PBA
    • Ossining Village Police PBA
    • Peekskill Police PBA
    • Pelham Manor Police PBA
    • Pelham Police PBA
    • Pleasantville Police PBA
    • Port Chester Police PBA
    • Poughkeepsie Police PBA
    • Rye Brook Police PBA
    • Rye City Police PBA
    • Scarsdale Police PBA
    • Sleepy Hollow Police PBA
    • Tarrytown Police PBA
    • Tuckahoe Police PBA
    • Warwick Police PBA
  • American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees
    • AFSCME District Council 35
    • New York City District Council of Municipal Local Unions, District Council 37
    • New York County and Municipal Employees, District Council 66
    • New York State Law Enforcement Officers Union, District Council 82
    • Community and Social Agency Employees, District Council 1707
  • Asbestos Workers Local 91
  • Boilermakers Local 5
  • Bricklayers & Allied Crafts Local 5
  • Bridge & Structural Steel Painters Local 806
  • Building and Construction Trades Council of New York State AFL-CIO
  • Building and Construction Trades Council of Westchester-Putnam AFL-CIO
  • Civil Service Employees Association of New York State Local 1000
  • Civil Service Employees Association of Westchester County Local 9200
  • Council of Administrators & Supervisors
  • Detectives Endowment Association
  • Elevator Constructors Local 1
  • Empire State Supervisors & Administrators Association
  • Fire Marshal Benevolent Association of Nassau County
  • Hudson Valley Area Labor Federation AFL-CIO
  • Hudson Valley Building & Construction Trades Council AFL-CIO
    • LiUNA Laborers’ Local 17
    • IEUC Elevator Constructors Local 138
    • IUOE Upstate New York Operating Engineers Local 158
    • LiUNA Cement Masons Local 262
    • Carpenters Local 279
    • Plumbers & Steamfitters Local 373
    • Teamsters Local 445
    • Millwrights Local 1163
  • IAFF Local 2956 Lake Mohegan Professional Firefighters
  • IAFF Local 628 Yonkers Fire
  • IBEW Electrical Workers Local 3
  • IBEW Electrical Workers Local 363
  • Iron Workers Local 40
  • Iron Workers Local 417
  • Ironworkers Local 197 Derrickmen and Riggers
  • IUOE Operating Engineers Local 137
  • IUOE Operating Engineers Local 15
  • IUOE Operating Engineers Local 30
  • IUPAT Local 262 Operative Plaster
  • IUPAT Local 7 Title, Marble & Terrazzo
  • IUPAT Local 8A-28A Metal Polishers
  • IUPAT Local Union 1087 Glaziers
  • IUPAT Painters District Council 9
  • LiUNA Local 235 Building Laborers’
  • LiUNA Local 60 Road Laborers’
  • LiUNA Local 669 Road Sprinkler Fitters
  • Mason Tenders District Council Of Greater New York & Long Island
  • Medical Society of the State of New York
  • Metallic Lathers and Reinforcing Ironworkers Local 46
  • MTA Police Benevolent Association
  • Nassau County Deputy Sheriff’s Benevolent Association Inc.
  • Nassau County Police Medic Association Inc.
  • Nassau County Sheriff’s Correction Officers Benevolent Association
  • New England Regional Council of Carpenters
  • New York City Uniformed Fire Officers Local 854 AFL-CIO
  • New York State AFL-CIO
  • New York State Building and Construction Trades Council
  • New York State Conference of the International Union of Operating Engineers
  • New York State Laborers’ Union
    • Blasters, Drill Runners and Miners Local Union 29
    • Concrete Workers District Council 16
      • Cement and Concrete Workers Local Union 6-A
      • Cement and Concrete Workers Local Union 18-A
      • Cement and Concrete Workers Local Union 20
    • Mason Tenders District Council Of Greater New York & Long Island
      • LiUNA General Building Laborers’ Local 66
      • LiUNA Construction & General Building Laborers’ Local 79
      • LiUNA Asbestos Lead and Hazardous Waste Laborers’ Local 78
      • LiUNA Waste Material, Recycling & General Industrial Laborers’ Local 108
      • Lay Faculty Association Local 1261
    • LiUNA Building Concrete, Excavation and Common Laborers’ Local Union 731
    • LiUNA Pavers & Roadbuilders District Council Laborers’ Local Union 101
  • New York State Nurses Association
  • New York State Pipe Trades Association
  • New York State Public Employees Federation
  • New York State Troopers PBA
  • Painters District Council 9
  • Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association
  • PBA of NYS
    • New York State Environmental Conservation Police Officers PBA
    • New York State Environmental Conservation Police Lieutenants Benevolent Association
    • New York State Environmental Conservation Police Superior Officers Association
    • New York State Forest Rangers PBA
    • New York State Forest Rangers Lieutenants Benevolent Association
    • New York State Forest Rangers Superior Officers Association
    • New York State Park Police Officers PBA
    • New York State Park Police Sergeants Benevolent Association
    • New York State Park Police Superior Officers Association
    • New York State University Police Lieutenants Benevolent Association
    • New York State University Police Officers PBA
  • Police Association of NYS (NYSAPBA)
    • Amityville PBA
    • East Hampton Town PBA
    • East Hampton Village PBA
    • Floral Park PBA
    • Freeport PBA
    • Glen Cove PBA
    • Great Neck Estates PBA
    • Hempstead PBA
    • Kings Point PBA
    • Lake Success PBA
    • Long Beach PBA
    • Lynbrook PBA
    • Malverne PBA
    • MTA PBA
    • Nassau County Detectives’ Association
    • Nassau County PBA
    • Nassau County Superior Officers’ Association
    • NYC Captains’ Endowment Association
    • NYC District Attorneys Detective Investigators’ Association
    • NYC Detectives’ Endowment Association
    • NYC Lieutenants’ Benevolent Association
    • NYC Retired Transit Police Association
    • NYC Sergeants’ Benevolent Association
    • NYS Park Police PBA
    • Old Brookville PBA
    • Old Westbury PBA
    • PBA of NYS – Environmental Conservation Police
    • PBA of NYS – Forest Rangers
    • PBA of NYS – Park Police
    • PBA of NYS – University (SUNY) Police
    • Port Authority PBA
    • Port Authority Police Detectives’ Endowment Association
    • Port Authority Police Lieutenants’ Benevolent Association
    • Port Authority Police Sergeants’ Benevolent Association
    • Port Washington PBA
    • Quogue Village
    • Retired Police Association of New York State
    • Riverhead PBA
    • Rockville Centre PBA
    • Sands Point PBA
    • Southampton Town PBA
    • Southampton Village PBA
    • Suffolk County Detectives’ Association
    • Suffolk County Detective Investigators’ PBA
    • Suffolk County Police Conference
    • Suffolk County Superior Officers’ Association
    • Waterfront Commission PBA
  • Police Conference of New York
  • Sheet Metal Workers Local 137
  • Sheet Metal Workers Local 38 JATC
  • Suffolk County Correction Officers Association
  • Supreme Court Officers Association
  • Teamsters Joint Council 16
  • Teamsters Local 456
  • Teamsters Local 813
  • Teamsters Local 81
  • UA Plumbers & Steamfitters Local 21
  • UBCJA Millwright & Machinery Erectors Local Union 740
  • UBCJA Local 1456 Dockbuilders
  • UBCJA Local 2287 Resilient Floor Coverers
  • UFA of Greater New York (FDNY) Local 94 IAFF
  • Uniformed EMS Officers Union, Local 3621 – FDNY
  • Uniformed EMT’s, Paramedics and Inspectors Local 2507 FDNY
  • Uniformed Fire Alarm Dispatchers Benevolent Association FDNY
  • United Cement Union Local 780
  • United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers Local 8
  • Utility Workers of America Local 1-2
  • Westchester County Correction Officers Benevolent Association
  • Westchester County Correction Superior Officers Benevolent Association
  • Westchester County PBA
  • Westchester Putnam Central Labor Body AFL-CIO
  • Yonkers PBA

Grant Supplies Funds for New Parking Lot and Other Amenities

Carmel, NY – Camarda Park is one of Carmel’s crown jewels, a 36-acre property that offers fields for baseball, softball, lacrosse, and soccer, as well as a kid’s playground, new basketball courts, and a spacious pavilion. It has received a number of improvements since opening in 2009, including a paved parking lot, which was added through a grant of $150,000 secured by Senator Terrence Murphy. Recently, elected officials and members of Carmel’s Recreation Department gathered in the park’s pristine parking lot to thank Senator Murphy for the grant and to acknowledge the team effort it has taken to turn the park into a thriving recreation center.

“Anytime we can keep kids off the streets and in a beautiful park, we’re doing some good for the community,” said Senator Murphy. “With the heroin and opioid epidemic infesting our communities, we need to have more places where kids can play sports and be with their families. I’m happy to see that our latest grant has been put to good use. It’s always a wonderful experience to work County Executive Odell and the Town of Carmel to do something positive for the town. This is what happens when everyone talks to one another to make sure the job gets done.”

“It was over twenty years ago, when I was President of the Carmel Sports Association, that we thought about building a park for the community, and now it’s a reality,” said Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “Camarda Park illustrates the value of sports associations. They create opportunities for families to become friends, and for friends to become families. It shows what you can do when you have generous people like the Camarda’s, the cooperation of the Town Board, and the support of Senator Murphy. It’s important to have solid representation in Albany and Senator Murphy provides that for us. And let’s not forget the contributions of the late James McDonough, who always supported this town and its residents.”

Carmel Town Supervisor Ken Schmitt added, “Thank you, Senator Murphy, you’ve always been there for us. We’re very fortunate to have the support of you and County Executive Odell. Paul Camarda donated this land. We wouldn’t be standing here if it wasn’t for his generosity and his commitment to our community. Dave (Furfaro) and Jimmy (Gilcrhrist) have helped bring this dream alive, but we would be remiss if we didn’t mention the contributions of Bob Buckley, the former Chairman of the town’s Recreation and Parks Committee, who worked tirelessly for this community and especially for this park.”

David Furfaro, Chairman, Town of Carmel Recreation and Parks Advisory Committee stated, “Camarda Park has a special place in my heart. It wasn’t an easy park to build. It took political courage to get it to this stage, and now it’s a wonderful place for kids and families. Senator Murphy has been a real friend of Carmel and the park by getting us several large grants to build it.”

Paul Camarda, who donated the land carrying his namesake, was among the many guests. “Nothing good comes easy. That includes getting the park to where it is today,” he commented. “Working together for a common goal is what makes this county special.”

Other attendees included Putnam County Legislator Neal Sullivan, James Gilchrist, Recreation and Parks Department Director, Town of Carmel, and Nina Kallmeyer, Senior Recreation Leader, Town of Carmel.

Urges Residents To Sign Online Letter Calling For PSC To Take Action Against NYSEG

POUND RIDGE, NY – The Public Service Commission oversees New York’s Department of Public Service.  Their primary mission is to, “ensure affordable, safe, secure and reliable access” to electricity and other utility services.  Residents of the 40th Senate District, especially NYSEG customers, say there is nothing reliable about their service provider.  Now, State Senator Terrence Murphy is urging residents to add their names to an online letter demanding the PSC take necessary action.

The community letter comes after the Hudson Valley State Senator sent two previous letters to John Rhodes, the Chair for the Public Service Commission and CEO for New York’s DPS.  On August 16th and again on September 24th Murphy detailed separate episodes of power outages on days described by meteorologists as fog or light rain.  Both letters demanded action of the regulatory agency and detailed the lack of faith NYSEG customers harbor for their utility company.

“I recognize and understand severe weather can cause outages but the PSC and NYSEG must recognize they are failing in their responsibility to deliver reliable power to its residents and customers,” said Senator Murphy. “Our office has been inundated by complaints from NYSEG customers, some who have lost power more than ten times this year for unexplicable reasons.  The PSC cannot continue to ignore us. It’s time to hand the reigns over to a company that can keep the lights on. It’s time to reopen the franchise in this region andd provide the quality of life that residents deserve.”

Senator Murphy reiterated that if the PSC is unwilling to act on behalf of NYSEG’s customers, then they should be informed – in writing – why the PSC is not holding NYSEG accountable.

Murphy’s demand is supported by an endless series of service interruptions, including:

  • On October 29, 2107, the fifth anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, tropical storm Philippe tore through the Hudson Valley, producing high-speed winds, torrential rain, and hazardous flooding. NYSEG was ill prepared for the swath of destruction Philippe left behind, including extended power outages and downed live power lines that blocked roads and driveways for several days.
  • On March 2, 2018, Winter Storm Riley walloped many areas in New York with over a foot of snow. The storm also caused extensive flooding and generated winds that topped out at nearly sixty miles per hour. The winds uprooted trees and snapped power lines, leaving thousands without power. Repair crews were late to respond and many customers were given inaccurate and unrealistic restoration times, remaining powerless for days instead of hours.
  • On March 7, 2018, the region was subjected to a second winter storm, Quinn, which produced blizzard-like conditions and knocked out power for more than a hundred thousand additional customers. Once again, NYSEG kept customers in the dark about when the power would be restored. Customers still without power from Riley.

In response to residents’ many questions, and in his capacity as Chairman of the New York State Senate’s Committee on Investigations and Government Operations, Senator Terrence Murphy hosted hearings in Albany and Somers to explore preparedness for Riley and Quinn, as well as steps that could be taken to ensure this sort of situation never occurs again by utility companies and state agencies. The hearings did little to assuage public opinion that NYSEG could handle severe future weather events.

 

Furthemore, dozens of customers have been denied reimbursements from the outages, which in some cases totaled thousands of dollars.  Senator Murphy’s office has directly engaged the utility company to advocate on behalf of its constituents only to be denied with little to no explanation.

In June the New York State Senate passed S.7262 which would finally hold utility companies accountable in how they address power outages.  Among the provisions, the legislation calls for a comprehensive review of reimbursement policies by the PSC.  While it passed the Senate the legislation failed to come for a vote in the Assembly.